BLACK FRIDAY: SHOPPING MADNESS AFTER THANKSGIVING

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Black Friday is the Friday following Thanksgiving Day in the United States, often regarded as the beginning of the Christmas shopping season. In recent years, most major retailers have opened extremely early and offered promotional sales to kick off the holiday shopping season, similar to Boxing Day sales in many Commonwealth Nations. Black Friday is not a federal holiday, but California and some other states observe “The Day After Thanksgiving” as a holiday for state government employees.

 

 

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Black Friday Shopping Guide

BLACK FRIDAY: shopping madness

PHOSPHENES

black-friday-macys

Thanksgiving is all about love, appreciation, family bonding, and other heartwarming things like that. But we can’t forget about Thanksgiving’s evil twin sister, Black Friday. Yes, Black Friday, which is all about materialism, greed, and beating the shit out of whoever is between you and those jeans marked down by 90%. It couldn’t get more American, could it? The day after – or often the night of – a massive feast, we transform into pure brutes; eating like savages transitions into behaving as such, as we embody a slew of stereotypes. Everywhere from suburban malls in Ohio to cosmopolitan boutiques in New York City is flooded with manic citizens hungry for the best sale. And yes, people have been (and probably will be) crucially injured. But never mind the self-deprecating American jokes. Plenty of people will definitely still be participating in the Black Friday madness, so here’s a few tips to…

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BBC LEARNING: TYPHOON HAIYAN

LISTEN AND WATCHCURRENT NEWS ABOUT THE TYPHOON IN PHILIPPINES, THEN DO THE EXERCISES THE TEACHER IS GOING TO GIVE YOU IN CALSS TO PRACTICE LISTENING AND SPEAKING IN CLASS.

ENGLISH BLOG BYANGUELA

http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learningenglish/language/wordsinthenews/2013/11/131111_witn_typhoon_story.shtml

Typhoon Haiyan: Destruction in the Philippines

Summary  11 November 2013

Officials estimate up to 10,000 people have died in Tacloban city and elsewhere in the Philippines in the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan. Many other people are now struggling to survive without food, shelter or clean drinking water.

Reporter: Jon Donnison

Homes destroyed by Typhoon Haiyan

This aerial photo shows destroyed houses in Tacloban, in the Philippines

 

EXERCISES AND TRANSCRIPT

 

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BBC LEARNING: TYPHOON HAIYAN

http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learningenglish/language/wordsinthenews/2013/11/131111_witn_typhoon_story.shtml

Typhoon Haiyan: Destruction in the Philippines

Summary  11 November 2013

Officials estimate up to 10,000 people have died in Tacloban city and elsewhere in the Philippines in the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan. Many other people are now struggling to survive without food, shelter or clean drinking water.

Reporter: Jon Donnison

Homes destroyed by Typhoon Haiyan

This aerial photo shows destroyed houses in Tacloban, in the Philippines

 

EXERCISES AND TRANSCRIPT

 

YOLANDA OR HAIYAN Devastating Typhoon in Philippines


Monster typhoon Haiyan roars across Philippines
One of the strongest typhoons ever to hit land has slammed the Philippines, forcing millions to take shelter.
Packing sustained winds of up to 320 km/h (199mph), Typhoon Haiyan left at least 10000 people dead, acording to the latest death toll, but it may be days before the full damage is known.
The storm ripped apart buildings and triggered landslides as it ploughed across the country’s central islands.
Haiyan – equivalent to a category five hurricane – is now heading towards Vietnam and southern China.
There were reports of buildings being ripped apart, flash floods and landslides. Schools and offices were closed, while ferry services and local flights were suspended. Hospitals and soldiers were on stand-by for rescue and relief operations.
Power and communication lines were also cut to some areas.
Most of the deaths have been caused by drowning and collapsed buildings. However, it is feared that the coastal cities will have even more casualties. With wires, trees and debris cutting off access to these areas, aid has been struggling to reach victims and unable to determine a final death toll.

“The wind here is whistling. It’s so strong and the heavy downpours are continuing,” Mai Zamora, from the charity World Vision, in Cebu, told the BBC.
“We’ve been hearing from my colleagues in [the city of] Tacloban that they’ve seen galvanised iron sheets flying just like kites.”
“It was frightening. The wind was so strong, it was so loud, like a screaming woman. I could see trees being top down,” Liwayway Sabuco, a saleswoman from Catbalogan, a major city on Samar, told AFP news agency.
It’s, the 25th tropical storm to enter Philippine territory this year.
In its path are areas already struggling to recover from a deadly 7.3-magnitude earthquake last month, including the worst-hit island of Bohol where about 5,000 people are still living in tents.
For further reading
BBC news
NY TIMES

DONER KEBAB INVENTOR DIES

BBC NEWS

26 October 2013
Doner kebab ‘inventor’ Kadir Nurman dies in Berlin
The Turkish immigrant credited with inventing the doner kebab has died in Berlin aged 80.
Kadir Nurman set up a stall in West Berlin in 1972, selling grilled meat and salad inside a flat bread.
He had noticed the fast pace of city life and thought busy Berliners might like a meal they could carry with them.
While there are other possible “doner inventors,” Mr Nurman’s contribution was recognised by the Association of Turkish Doner Manufacturers in 2011.
The combination of juicy meat, sliced from a rotating skewer, with all the trimmings and optional chilli sauce, has since become a firm fast-food favourite in Germany, and elsewhere.
According to the Berlin-based Association of Turkish Doner Manufacturers in Europe, there are now 16,000 doner outlets in Germany.
More than 1,000 exist in Berlin to tempt peckish late-night revellers on the capital’s streets.
German companies producing the meat and the machinery for grilling supply 80% of the EU market, the BBC’s Steve Evans reports from Berlin.
Mr Nurman, who emigrated to Germany in 1960, did not patent his invention, and thus did not particularly profit from the doner’s subsequent success.
But in a 2011 interview with the Frankfurter Rundschau, he expressed little bitterness.
He was happy that so many Turkish people were able to make a living from doners, he said, and that millions of people ate them.

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